Laboratory Diagnostics

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    Dietary Antigen IgG C3D

    £280.00

    Technology and Methodology

    The Dunwoody Labs AIMS profiles is the only test on the market that measures both IgG and immune complexes containing the complement fragment complement (C3d), for multiple food antigens and actually reports it. Random serum samples were measured for dietary allergen specific immunoglobulin using the Amplified Immunological Monitoring System (AIMS).  AIMS are optimized for the for the semi-quantitative measurement of human immunoglobulins IgA, IgE, IgG, IgG4 and IgM in serum samples using an indirect ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay).  The system also is capable of detecting immune complexes that contain the complement markers C3D or C1q. Removing allergenic foods based on these results dramatically decreased those food reactions in 30 subjects and was confirmed in follow-up tests.3

    Complement Activation
    The AIMS Profile measures complement activation for multiple foods. Complement activation is well-defined in the research as not only a cause of inflammation, but one of the strongest causes. The complement pathway acts as the body’s SWAT team to aggressively attack and clear threats, such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and allergens. It is part of our innate system, meaning that we are born with this immune defense mechanism.

    Complement components patrol the blood harmlessly, but in an instant can go on the attack to kill and remove dangerous molecules from the body. When activated, the complement pathway sets off a domino effect of inflammatory cytokines, mast cell degranulation, and cell membrane destruction. It is a powerful protective force but can damage tissues if not kept under control. Complement is a quantifiable, reliable biomarker of tissue inflammation.

    Complement serves as a link between the innate and adaptive immune response. This is because complement uses immunoglobulins to help identify dangerous molecules that should be destroyed. IgG1, IgG3, and IgM can activate complement.

    IgG Subclasses 1–4
    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is the main immunoglobulin circulating in human blood and helps protect us from infection and outside antigens. There are four subclasses: IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4. IgG1 responds to new food antigens. IgG2 and IgG3 react to cell surface oligosaccharides of viruses, protozoa, and foods, which can be allergenic. IgG4 is commonly related to delayed food sensitivity symptoms. IgG can also activate the complement system to recruit an inflammatory response. The AIMS Food Sensitivity Profile measures total IgG (subclasses 1-4) antibodies for 88 foods.

    Technological advancements
    Other Food Sensitivity Methods may use a technology known as live cell analysis. In this technique, patients’ white cells are put on a plate, exposed to a food, and any reaction is measured and recorded. However, white cell growth is not an accepted sign of true food sensitivity or allergic reaction. Growth can be caused by many things.

    Other antibody assays may only measure IgG antibodies, which can miss food reactions that activate the inflammatory complement cascade. Finally, other food sensitivity tests may measure only certain subclasses of IgG antibodies, rather than measuring all four, as on Dunwoody Labs AIMS Food Sensitivity Profile.

    Sample Type
    Serum
    Turnaround time
    15 working days
    Additional Information / Instructions

    List of 88 Foods and Additives Measured by the AIMS Food Sensitivity Profile:

    Apple 
    Asparagus 
    Aspergillus mix 
    Avocado 
    Banana 
    Barley 
    Bean, Lima 
    Bean, String/Green
    Beef 
    Black pepper
    Blueberry 
    Brewer’s yeast 
    Broccoli
    Cabbage
    Candida
    Cantaloupe
    Cacao
    Carrot
    Casein
    Cashew
    Cauliflower
    Celery
    Cherry
    Chicken
    Cinnamon
    Clam
    Cacao
    Coconut
    Codfish
    Coffee
    Corn
    Cottonseed
    Cow’s milk
    Crab
    Cucumber
    Egg albumin
    Egg yolk
    English walnut
    Flax Seed
    Flounder
    Garlic
    Ginger
    Gluten
    Green Pea
    Goat’s milk
    Grapefruit
    Grapes
    Green olive
    Green pepper
    Halibut
    Honeydew melon
    Hops
    Kidney bean
    Lemon
    Lettuce
    Lobster
    Mushroom
    Mustard
    Navy bean
    Oat
    Onion
    Orange
    Peach
    Peanut
    Pear
    Pecan
    Pineapple
    Pinto bean
    Plum
    Pork
    Rice
    Rye
    Salmon
    Scallops
    Sesame
    Shrimp
    Soybean
    Spinach
    Squash mix
    Strawberry
    Sweet potato
    Tea
    Tomato
    Tuna
    Turkey
    Vanilla
    Watermelon
    White potato
    Whole wheat

    Researchers estimate that at least 60% of the UK population suffers from unsuspected food reactions that can cause or complicate health problems. 

    Clinical Signs and Symptoms: Eczema, Joint pain, Consitpation, Diarrhoea, Gas, Headaches, Bloating, Palpitations, Bowel dysfunction, Anxiety, Depression, Indigestion, Fatigue, Congestion, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    What you eat every day sends a very important message to your body and even to your DNA. On average in the U.K, we spend approximately 2.5 hours eating or drinking each day, and we consume 1,966.3 pounds of food (nearly one ton) each year! When evaluating your health, it is important to analyze the foods you eat often to see how your immune system responds to them. In a study of 30 people who took the Food Sensitivity C3d and IgG Profile, headaches and chronic GI symptoms involving pain, diarrhea, constipation, and bloating decreased when the allergenic foods were identified and removed.

    Because of the high frequency of food sensitivities and the tremendous quantity of food that we eat on a regular basis, many doctors use food sensitivity testing to help get to the root cause of chronic, unexplained illnesses.

    FAQs:
    What do I do about a high Aspergillus Mix Reaction on the Dietary Antigen Test?

    Dietary Antigen Test reviews IgE, IgG4, Total IgG and C3d response to 4 species of Aspergillus; A. oryzae, A. niger, A. repens and A. terreus. We also offer an Airborne Allergy test that includes IgE reactivity to additional mold species. Key foods to avoid for elevated mold reaction are moldy cheeses, peanuts, melons and sake.

    For patients with severe reactions and active symptoms, a more restrictive mold diet may be needed. To get a better picture of how the mold is shifting immune function, markers such as TGF-Beta can be measured to see how immunoreactive a patient is. Also consider using Konjak Fiber which binds to mold aphlyotoxin.

    More restrictive mold diet suggestions:

    Avoid the following foods:

    • Peanuts
    • Cheese - all cheese, especially aged cheese
    • Melons
    • Vinegar - and vinegar containing food (mayonnaise, salad dressings, catsup, chili sauce, pickled foods, relishes, green olives, mustard
    • Alcoholic liquors, beer, wine and sake
    • Soured breads, such as pumpernickel, coffee cakes, and other foods made with large amounts of yeast
    • Sauerkraut
    • Cider and homemade root beer
    • Pickled and smoked meats and fish, including delicatessen foods, sausages, frankfurters, corned beef and pickled tongue, ham and bacon
    • All dried fruits such as apricots, dates, prunes, figs and raisins
    • Canned tomatoes unless homemade
    • All canned juice
    • Eat only freshly opened canned foods and freshly prepared fruits
    • Do not eat meat or fish more than 25 hours old
    • Avoid foods made from leftovers such as meatloaf, hash and croquettes
    • Avoid hamburger unless made from freshly ground meat

    Instructions:

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    Sample Reports / Downloads